Custom radio and checkbox inputs using CSS

In my never ending quest to find weird and wonderful ways to abuse CSS and all its little intricacies, I have come up with a pretty good way of using CSS to create custom radio and checkbox inputs without JavaScript, that are accessible, keyboard controlled, don’t use any hacks and degrade nicely in non supporting browsers. The journey wasn’t easy and I was on the brink of filing it in the “to crazy” folder, never to be seen again. Luckily I had a brain wave that paid off and actually allowed this to be a very viable solution that degrades beautifully and works in 80% of the browsers. This is my story. Continue reading

Web Notifications

Web Notifications allows users to get updates on a webpage even if they’re not looking at it, shown to them through small notification boxes, think growl. This opens up some great potential for the current web apps out there. When you get a new email it could popup a little notification much like our desktop email clients do now or your twitter page could let you know when new @replies have come in, the possibilities are endless. Continue reading

Futurebox, revisited

Earlier this year I unleashed futurebox into the wild. It got a whole lot more attention than I anticipated and I got some great feedback. Since then, I have been slowly working on a new version of futurebox which incorporates many new features. Continue reading

Font Dragr: A drag and drop font tester

After playing with the new file API draft spec available in Firefox 3.6 with my drag and drop upload article. I had another idea when I was playing with custom fonts, @font-face, in the browser. What if you could drag an drop a font file (otf, ttf, svg, woff) from your desktop into the browser and have text rendered on the fly using any available valid font. Continue reading

Drag and drop file uploading using JavaScript

With the recent announcement of the File API draft specification being published I’m sure a lot of people were confused as to what it could really do and why it is truly a powerful API. Firefox’s latest alpha release of their 3.6 browser, aka Namoroka, is the first to implement this new draft specification. Continue reading